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Last Updated:4/22/03
State Department required report to Congress on contractors in Colombia, April 14, 2003

Report to Congress

Certain Counternarcotics Activities in Colombia

Submitted to the Congress
by the Secretary of State
Pursuant to Section 694 (b) of the
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003
(Public Law 107-228)

Prepared by the United States Department of State

Report on Certain Counternarcotics Activities in Colombia

Introduction

This report is submitted pursuant to section 694(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) which states:

“(b) REPORT OF CERTAIN COUNTERNARCOTICS ACTIVITIES--

(1) DECLARATION OF POLICY — It is the policy of the United States to encourage the transfer of counternarcotics activities carried out in Colombia by United States businesses that have entered into agreements with the Department or the Department of Defense to conduct such activities, to Colombian nationals, in particular personnel of the Colombian antinarcotics police, when qualified personnel are available.

(2) REPORT.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and not later than April 1 or each year thereafter, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the activities of United States businesses that have entered into agreements in the previous 12-month period with the Department of the Department of Defense to carry out counternarcotics activities in Colombia.

(3) CONTENTS.--Each such report shall contain the following:

(A) The name of each United States business described in paragraph (2) and description of the counternarcotics activities carried out by the business in Colombia:

(B) The total value of all payments by the Department and the Department of Defense to each such business for such activities.

(C) A written statement justifying the decision by the Department and the Department of Defense to enter into an agreement with each such business for such activities.

(D) An assessment of the risks to personal safety and potential involvement in hostilities incurred by employees of each such business as a result of their activities in Colombia.

(E) A plan to provide for the transfer of the counternacrotics activities carried out by such United States businesses to Colombian nationals, in particular personnel of the Colombian antinarcotics police.

(4) DEFINITION.--In this subsection, the term “United States business” means any person (including any corporation, partnership, or other organization) that is subject to the jurisdiction of the United States or organized under the laws of the United States, but does not include any person (including any corporation, partnership, or other organization) that performs contracts involving personal services.”

The U.S. businesses that have entered into agreements in the previous 12-month period with the Department of State or the Department of Defense to carry out counternarcotics activities in Colombia are:

FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

1. Contractor: Lockheed-Martin

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of maintenance personnel and logistic support to assist the Colombian National Police (CNP) in the maintenance and support of Black Hawk helicopters.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $2,128,663

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The FY 1999 Emergency Supplemental Appropriation financed these Black Hawks helicopters, the first in the CNP fleet. A contract was awarded because the CNP had neither the technical expertise nor the financial resources to maintain the aircraft. This particular Delivery Order has ended and the work under it incorporated in a broader delivery order which supports the entire CNP fleet and which is discussed below.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: The risk to contractor staff of six employees was minimal as their work was, for the most part, performed at the CNP’s secure Guaymaral base near Bogota. The CNP provided security for personnel engaged in, activities outside Bogota.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: At present, the CNP does not have the technical, personnel or financial resources to adequately maintain and support their aircraft. A primary contractor responsibility, however, is to train CNP personnel to perform all aircraft maintenance functions. INL anticipates that with further progress in the next several years by the Government of Colombia (GOC) in the eradication of narcotic crops and against insurgent groups, sufficient resources will be available to devote to this support activity.

2. Contractor: Lockheed- Martin

A. Contractor Activities: Installation of force protection systems (intrusion detection equipment) at Villa Garzon and Guaymaral.

B. Value of Payment made in FY ‘02: $3,525,077

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The Colombian National Police do not have technical, administrative or the financial resources to design and install these sophisticated systems. The only available sources of the required systems are commercial contractors.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: The risk to contractor staff of approximately 25 personnel is considered low as they do not participate in operations at any level and security where they work is provided by the Colombian National Police. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: INL expects the equipment installation to be complete by the end of July 2003. Some maintenance support for the systems will be necessary but it will require little, if any, contractor presence.

3. Contractor: Lockheed-Martin

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of aviation maintenance, logistic and other technical personnel as well as the acquisition of spare and repair parts for Colombian National Police Air Service aircraft.

B. Value of payments Made in FY ‘02: $3,133,431

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The services are necessary for the adequate support of Colombian National Police (CNP) aircraft. The Colombian national Police do not have sufficient technical or financial resources to provide this support. Commercial contractors are the only available source of this support.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: The risk to the contractor’s one hundred and fifty employees is considered minimal, as they do not participate in operations. The Colombian National Police provide security at their work sites. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: As noted previously in this report, the CNP do not have the technical, administrative or financial resources to support their aircraft. - As the government makes progress against -narcotic crop cultivation and insurgent groups,.. we expect more resources to become available. The contractor will continue to provide on-the-job training for CNP personnel until the GOC has enough resources to fully support this mission.

4. Contractor: DynCorp Aerospace Technologies, Inc,

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of pilots, maintenance technicians and logistic support to the Colombian Army (COLAR) Counter-Drug Brigades and to the Colombian National Police aerial eradication program.

B. Value of Payments made in FY ‘02: $79,200,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The Government of Colombia does not have the personnel, technical or financial resources necessary to support these operations. The only available sources of the required services are commercial contractors.

D. Assessment of the Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: The risk to contractor employees, depending on the nature of their duties and location of activities, is considered significant. The Colombian Army and the Colombian National Police provide security for contractor employees.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: At present, the CNP does not have the technical, personnel or financial resources to adequately maintain and support their aircraft. A primary contractor responsibility, however, is to train CNP personnel to perform all aircraft maintenance functions. INL and the GOC are also supporting a pilot training program. The Department expects that, with further progress in the next several years by the Government of Colombia (GOC) in the eradication of narcotic crops and against insurgent groups, sufficient resources will be available to devote to this support activity.

5. Contractor: DynCorp Aerospace Operations, Ltd.

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of a wide variety of personal services to the Colombian Army, Colombian National Police eradication program, U.S. Bureau of Prisons programs and the Narcotics Affairs Section. Personnel include advisors for the canine program, fuel specialists, accountants, secretaries, drivers, logisticians, etc.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $4,875,017

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The services are necessary to support this wide array of programs. The Government of Colombia does not have the financial resources to provide them.

D. Assessment of the Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: The risk to contractor personnel is considered low. Either the Colombian National Police or the Colombian Army provides security in operational areas. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: As is the case with other aircraft operation, maintenance and logistic support, the CNP does not have the technical, personnel or financial resources to undertake this mission. The Department expects that, with continued success against narcotic crops and insurgent groups, funds will become available to support this activity.

6. Contractor: ARINC, Inc.

A. Contractor Activities: Maintenance and logistics support for Colombian National Police C-26 aircraft and associated surveillance equipment.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $1,146,826

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The Colombian National Police do not have the required technical, personnel and financial resources to support these aircraft and their relatively sophisticated airborne surveillance equipment. Commercial contractors are the only available source of the required services.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: The risk is considered low because contractor personnel perform their work at installations secured by the Colombian National Police. Nevertheless, Colombia remains-a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: As is the case with other aircraft and aircraft systems operation, maintenance and logistic support, the CNP does not have the technical, personnel or financial resources to undertake this mission. The Department expects that, with continued success against narcotic crops and insurgent groups funds will become available to support this activity.

7. Contractor: ARINC, Inc

A. Contactor Activities: Training of personnel and logistic support for aircraft for the Air Bridge Denial Program.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $3,557,929

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The services are required to ensure the safety of Air Bridge Denial operations. The Government of Colombia does not have the technical or financial resources to support the effort and the required services are only available from commercial sources.

D. Assessment of the Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: The risk assessed to safety and potential involvement in hostilities by ARINC employees flying in the AED program is assessed as “low”. There are several reasons for this conclusion: prohibitions on flying combat missions with the C-560 aircraft, the fact that the aircraft has a proven reliability record and is a multi-engine jet, no previous history of injury or potential hostilities in the program when run by government operations, and the speed, altitude and unpredictable flight paths for actual missions. The risk to ground personnel (maintenance and managers) is the same as for any Embassy employee in Colombia; all personnel are housed on military installations or in Embassy approved residences in Bogotá. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: The question of transferring program elements to the GOC must be answered in multiple parts.

  • Air and Ground Mission Specialists - program and mission cannot be transferred to Colombia because, as structured, these positions are for U.S. oversight and monitoring of the program to ensure compliance with all agreed operating principles.
  • Pilot and Sensor Operator training - portions of the pilot training could be transferred to the COLAF, which would require Colombian pilots to become instructors/evaluators. This can probably happen within two years under current projections of flying hours. However, there is a requirement for ARINC/U.S. instructors to periodically fly and observe missions as long as the assets remain USG property on a no-cost lease to the FAC.
  • Basic Aircraft Training - there is no way to transfer basic aircraft training to the FAC. It would require initial attendance in a Flight Safety or similar course of instruction to include simulator training. Additionally, yearly simulator re-qualification is required.
  • Mission Sensor Operator - Colombian Air Force (FAC) will include sensor training in courses once materials are transferred and the FAC course certified. Once again, periodic inspection of the classroom and flight instruction would need to be made by instructors to ensure compliance with standards and stated objectives.
  • Maintenance of Aircraft - can be transferred to the FAC provided their technicians attend formal training in the U.S. or courses are developed and taught in-country. INL is exploring both options. Again, there will still be a requirement for ARINC certified maintenance technicians to sign-off maintenance activities on the C-560 aircraft.

8. Contractor: ARINC, Inc.

A. Contractor Activities: Fuel systems upgrades at six Colombian National Police Airfields.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $1,549,309

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The Colombian National Police fuel systems at six airfields need emergency upgrading and the CNP did not have the required technical, personnel and financial resources to support the upgrades of these facilities. Commercial contractors are the only available source of the required upgrades and installation.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: The risk is considered low because contractor personnel perform their work at these airfields secured by the Colombian National Police. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: The fuel equipment installation should be complete by the end of June 2003. Some maintenance support for the systems will be necessary but it will require little, if any, contractor presence.

 

FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

1. Contractor: TRW

A. Contractor Activity: Acquire, install, integrate, test, document, and support a radar data processing and display system and voice’ communications system.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $4,300,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services:

  • Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Commander Colombian Air Force and the Chief of the Military Group of the United States, 22 Feb 1989.
  • Program Management Directive (PMD) 000l(l)/PE 12446F, and 27440F for Counterdrug Surveillance and Control System (CSCS) 29 Oct 1996.
  • Mission Need Statement: ROC 2-84, 6 June 1984
  • Operational Requirements Document: U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) 02-84-I-A (Rev 2), 24 July 1991

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: Low. Contractor work in Colombia was limited to Bogota. The Regional Security Officer (RSO) and Military Group (MilGp) Security Chief provided guidance to the contractor while in country. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: A transition plan that transfers day-to-day maintenance of the system to the Colombian Air Force prior to the end of the operations and maintenance (O&M) options will have to be coordinated with DASD-CN and negotiated with the Colombian Government.

2. Contractor: Matcom

A. Contractor Activity: Coordinate activities between the U.S. and Colombia Air Force for programs in Colombia.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $120,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services:

  • Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Commander Colombian Air Force and the Chief of the Military Group of the United States, 22 Feb 1989.
  • Program Management Directive (PMD) 000l(l)/PE 12446F, and 27440F for Counterdrug Surveillance and Control System (CSCS), 29 Oct 1996.
  • Mission Need Statement: ROC 2-84, 6 June 1984
  • Operational Requirements Document: USSOUTHCOM 02-84-I-A (Rev 2), 24 July 1991

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: Low. Contractor is a Colombian resident. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: None

3. Contractor: Cambridge Communications

A. Contractor Activity: Move radar equipment from Leticia to the Tres Esquinas site. Radio equipment and antennas were disassembled, moved, reassembled, integrated, tested and documented at new location.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $450,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services:

  • Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Commander Colombian Air Force and the Chief of the Military Group of the United States, 22 Feb 1989.
  • Program Management Directive (PMD) 0001(1)/PE 12446F, and 27440F for Counterdrug Surveillance and Control System (CSCS), 29 Oct 1996.
  • Mission Need Statement: ROC 2-84, 6 June 1984
  • Operational Requirements Document: USSOUTHCOM 02-84-I-A (Rev 2) , 24 July 1991

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: Low. The RSO and MilGp Security Chief provided guidance to the contractor while in country. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: None.

4. Contractor: Lockheed Martin

A. Contractor Activity: Lockheed Martin is responsible for providing contractor logistics support within Colombia to support four C-l30Bs and two C-l30Hs heavy transport planes. These responsibilities include four technicians to train and assist the Colombia Air Force (COLAF) personnel in the proper procedures for inspections, testing, troubleshooting, servicing, and conducting scheduled and unscheduled maintenance of C-l30 aircraft for a period of one year. In addition, the contractor will provide spares, tools, and support equipment within dollar ceilings. Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor for C-130s and won the FAST contract awarded by U.S. Air Force (USAF).

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $4,216,748

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: A contract was awarded because the COLAF had neither the technical expertise nor the financial resources to train their personnel in a timely manner to meet mission requirements.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Personnel: Low. Since the four contractor technicians work in Bogotá, the risk is low. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: At this time there is no plan to transition all responsibilities to the host nation. The current program is funded through CY03 and extending the program depends upon available funding. We believe that the current program should be extended through CY08 at which time, the Colombian Air Force should be well on their way to self-sufficiency. During the next five years the Colombian Air Force will need to dispose of some of their older aircraft and obtain newer used models.

5. Contractor: Lockheed-Martin

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of UH-60 Blackhawk instructor pilot support to assist the Colombian Army (COLAR) in training aviators to fly required unit mission tasks in Black Hawk helicopters.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $813,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: A contract was awarded because the COLAR had neither the technical expertise nor the financial resources to train their aviators in a timely manner to meet mission requirements. This particular Delivery Order has ended and the work under it is being conducted in the unit by COLAR instructors trained by the U.S. Army. Training is being monitored by the Technical Assistance Fielding Team (TAFT) and DOS/INL.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. The risk to contractor staff of six employees was minimal as their work was, for the most part, performed at the COLAR’s secure Tolemaida base. The COLAR provided security for personnel engaged in activities within the flight training areas. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: At present, the COLAR does have the minimum required personnel to conduct training. A primary TAFT responsibility is to continue the growth of the COLAR Aviation’s capabilities. We anticipate that in the next several years, the GOC will have sufficient resources to support this activity.

6. Contractor: Lockheed-Martin

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of Huey II instructor pilot support to assist the Colombian Army (COLAR) in training aviators in aircraft series qualification and to fly required unit mission tasks in Huey II helicopters.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $3,600,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: A contract was awarded because the COLAR had neither the technical expertise nor the financial resources to train their aviators in a timely manner to meet mission requirements. The COLAR does not have instructors qualified to train in the Huey II. The preponderance of available aviators are graduates of the Initial entry Rotary Wing course at Fort Rucker Alabama or Melgar Colombia. Training flows from the initial course in the UH-1H to a series qualification in the Huey II. The -eries qualification is followed by intensive unit mission training. This particular Delivery Order is on-going. Training is being monitored by the Technical Assistance Fielding Team (TAFT).

D.Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. The risk to contractor staff of six employees is minimal as their work is, for the most part, performed at the COLAR’s secure’ Tolemaida base. The COLAR provided security for personnel engaged in activities within the flight training areas. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: At present, the COLAR does not have the minimum required personnel to conduct training. A primary TAFT responsibility is to continue the growth of the COLAR Aviation’s capabilities. We anticipate that in the next several years, the GOC will have sufficient resources to support this activity.

7. Contractor: Lockheed-Martin

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of UH-1H and Huey II instructor pilot support to assist the Technical Assistance Fielding Team (TAFT) Commander with training and over sight of the Initial Entry Rotary Wing (IERW) program and the Huey II program. Provision of a UH-1H maintenance examiner/test pilot to assist the TAFT Commander and COLPIF to provide maintenance support-for IERW.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $1,700,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: A contract was awarded because the U.S. Army has a limited number of Spanish speaking UH-lH qualified instructor pilots and maintenance evaluators (ME) available to support the mission. The Huey II is not a standard Department of Defense (DoD) aircraft and expertise in that airframe is not available in the DoD inventory. The COLAF does not have the capability at this time to maintain aircraft to DoD standards. The ME was provided to assist the COLAF in maintenance and training personnel to U.S. Army standards and procedures. This particular Delivery Order is on-going and will remain in place as part of the TAFT until a change in mission is dictated.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. The risk to contractor staff of two employees is minimal as their work is, for the most part, performed at the COLAR and COLAF secure bases at Tolemaida and Melgar. The COLAR provided security for personnel engaged in activities within the flight training and maintenance test flight areas. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: These positions will terminate when the mission to train the requisite number of Huey II and IERW aviators is completed. At that time, we anticipate a change of mission and composition of the TAFT.

8. Contractor: Lockheed-Martin

A. Contractor Activities:

Provision of UH-lH and Huey II Flight Simulators in support of Initial Entry Rotary Wing (IERW) and Huey II sustainment. The contractor has built a facility in Melgar to house an upgraded 2B24 UH-1H Synthetic Flight Training System (SFTS) in support of IERW. The 2B24 will be installed and maintained by contract for six months starting in March 03. The contractor will provide training to COLAF personnel during their stay at Melgar.

A Huey II simulator will be installed by the contractor in a DoS built facility in FY04. A similar arrangement for maintenance and training will be provided.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $7,500,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: A contract was awarded to provide a 2B24 SFTS to meet the requirements of the program of instruction at the US Army’s aviation training school. The device will provide needed instrument training and sustainment to all branches of the Colombian services. The contract provides a refurbished/upgraded device from a U.S. contractor. Expertise in training and maintaining the system is not available in country and will be provided by the contractor. The Huey II device will provide instrument training and sustainment to COLMIL forces. The device will have a visual capability to assist in training tactical maneuvers and inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions situations. This will assist in reducing the risk factors to crews flying in Colombia. Oversight of training at Melgar will be provided by the TAFT. The Department of State (DoS) will provide oversight at the Tolemaide facility.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. The risk to contractor staff of two employees is minimal as their work is performed at the COLAR and COLAF secure bases at Tolemaida and Melgar. Additional personnel, up to six, will be involved in the initial installation at each location. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Upon completion of installation of the devices, two personnel will remain to ‘provide maintenance expertise and train Colombian Military (COLMIL) operators. The maintainers will remain until DOD meets its training obligations. At that time the COLMIL will assume maintenance obligations.

9. Contractor: DynCorp Aerospace Technologies, mc,

A. Contractor Activities: Provision of UH-60 Blackhawk Night

Vision Goggle (NVG) instructor pilot support to assist the Colombian Army (COLAR) in training aviators to fly with night vision goggles (NVGs) in Black Hawk helicopters. This particular Delivery Order has ended and the work under it is being conducted in the unit by COLAR instructors trained by the U.S. Army in Colombia and at Fort Rucker Alabama. Training is being monitored by the Technical Assistance Fielding Team (TAFT) and DOS/INL.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $1,292,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: A contract was awarded because the COLMIL did not have the requisite skill sets or numbers of instructors to train aviators under NVG conditions in the Black Hawk helicopter. To meet the required training objectives, additional skilled personnel were required to perform this task.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. The risk to contractor staff of 6 employees was minimal, as their work was performed at the COLAR secure base at Tolemaida or in the flight training area. The COLAR provided security for personnel engaged in activities within the flight training areas. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: The COLAR continues to build upon the corps of NVG-qualified personnel provided by the contractor training. As experience and numbers grow, they will become self-sustaining by developing NVG instructors. The issue remains with that the number of aircraft is much greater than the availability of personnel being qualifed for NVGs. Until the number of qualified available personnel catches up with operational requirements, the program will remain dependent upon external sources to supply the bulk of the aviator requirements for the UH-60 helicopters.

10. Contractor: Virginia Electronic Systems, Inc. (VES)

A. Contractor Activities: Virginia Electronic Systems, Inc. (VES), installs value added equipment in an array of boats purchased for Colombia by DOD. VES tests the boats and prepares them for shipment to Colombia. Contractor meet the boats in-country for boat introduction to and training for Colombian Riverine Commandos. Contractor also travels in­country to assist Colombia in boat repairs.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $150,000 -- including repair parts.

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: VES employees are reasonably priced, ex-navy electricians, mechanics and boat drivers, and a natural selection as a support team for working in the jungle.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: High. The risk to these, and traveling personnel, is high when the threat to Americans is high. Contractor personnel, however, are not likely to be involved in hostilities.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: There is no plan, except, possibly, to train Navy, small craft school (NAVSCIATTS) instructors on specific boat operation and, if the risk is too high, have NAVSCIATTS personnel go in­country in place of VES personnel.

11. Contractor: Air Park Sales and Serivce, Inc. (APSS)

A. Contractor Activities: Provide aircraft radio and equipment upgrades for the Colombian Navy. Provide program and aircraft technical support for the COLAF SA2-37B aircraft.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $1,100,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: APSS was selected via the GSA contract process to provide specialized training not available in Colombia.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risk to employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. All work is preformed on Colombian military bases primarily Bogotá, Cartagena and Apiay. All employees adhere to U.S. Embassy guidelines for safety and security (including daily reporting). All overseas travelers are required to have received Anti-terrorism Force Protection Briefing Level 1 before commencing travel. All traveling to Colombia receive U.S. Milgp Colombia Threat and Safety Briefing upon arrival. All flight activity is for training and flight skills standardization only. No operational flights whatsoever are conducted. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: All current projects are completed or will be completed by the end of June 03. These projects involve upgrades to Colombian military equipment (Navy and Air Force) that will be transfer to the appropriate Colombian military branch.

12. Contractor: Integrated AeroSystems, Inc.

A. Contractor Activities: Perform inspection, acceptance, and ferry flights of Schweizer SA 2-37B, Low Acoustic Noise Airborne System (LANAS) aircraft to Colombia. Train Colombian Air Force (FAC) pilots and sensor operators to safely fly the aircraft and operate the on-board sensor systems. Instruction is conducted at Apiay AFB, Colombia and includes tail wheel transition, aircraft systems specific, instrument and night proficiency, as well as payload (FLIR/High Resolution TV/COMINT/DF) and mission profile training. Train selected FAC pilots and payload operators to assume LANAS instructor duties. Familiarize FAC pilots with international operational procedures during ferry flight. Provide experienced technicians (aircraft mechanics) on a full time basis at Apiay AFB and as needed in AOG (aircraft on ground) situations at outlying bases. Contractor technicians help less experienced FAC technicians understand troubleshooting, preventive maintenance and major component replacement on LANAS turbo-charged piston engine aircraft. Most FAC technicians have jet and turbo-prop experience, but lack exposure to piston engine aircraft, such as the LANAS. In the interest of developing and maintaining such skills in Colombia, a subcontract was placed with a Colombian owned, Bogotá-based general aviation -company to provide this service. By year’s end, FAC personnel were performing all but the most complex tasks with only minimal advice and coaching from the contract personnel. Provide warranty and post-warranty U.S. vendor repair of LANAS aircraft major components and high value items, such as avionics, weather radar, cockpit displays, FLIR, COMINT/DF, etc.

B. Value of contract: $560,000.00

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Integrated AeroSystems, Inc. was selected by the prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, as being the only company available with experience operating and deploying LANAS type aircraft, familiarity with the Latin American environment, and having broad knowledge of counternarcotics operations. This expertise does not exist in Colombia.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risk to employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. The preponderance of activity has been conducted at Apiay AFB with significantly less work being done at Cali AFB and Barranquilla AFB. Each base is heavily protected by physical barriers and well-armed military personnel; All flight activity is conducted in the general area of the bases, allowing for rapid response by rescue assets should a mechanical failure occur. All flight activity is for training and flight skills standardization ONLY. No operational, flights whatsoever are conducted. Management and instructor personnel are mature, experienced and thoroughly briefed on the exigencies of operating in Colombia. They conduct themselves accordingly in Bogotá and the above named FAC bases. Subcontractor maintenance technicians are U.S. trained Colombian nationals. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be -potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Each of the above listed training and support activities are designed from the very beginning to ultimately transfer full responsibility to the FAC. Provision of equipment, sustainment, logistics supplies and skills training of personnel (pilots, sensor operators and technicians) are planned and executed in a manner calculated to develop individual and group skills in logistics, aircraft maintenance and operations, mission planning, intelligence collection and analysis to leave the FAC with an organic instructor cadre to ensure skill levels are maintained in the years ahead. IAS already has reduced full-time instructors from two to one person. Maintenance coaching support for FAC mechanics has been highly successful and by year-end was reduced from full-time to half-time. That trend will continue in the months ahead as the FAC demonstrate growing skill levels.

13. Contractor: Integrated AeroSystems, Inc.

A. Contractor Activities: Provide component overhaul of LANAS aircraft major components and high value items, such as engines, turbo-chargers, alternators, starters, wiring harnesses, fuel injection systems, propellers, propeller governors, etc.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $50,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Integrated AeroSystems, Inc. was selected by the prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, as being the only company available with extensive knowledge of LANAS aircraft and systems, as well as the local contacts in Colombia to establish and manage the capability. This expertise does not exist in Colombia.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risk to employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. The preponderance of activity has been, conducted at the well-protected subcontractor facility at Guaymaral Airport in Bogota and to a lesser extent at Apiay AFB. Most of the work is performed in Colombia by Colombian nationals. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all co unterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: To maximum extent possible, work is accomplished in Colombia using a local general aviation industry contractor in order to establish and sustain an indigenous capability. Such capability can be used by the FAC as they assume complete responsibilities for these activities. Thrust of contract was to impress upon FAC technicians the need for regular interval inspection, overhaul or replacement of critical aircraft components. By year end, the FAC had transitioned to utilizing the local contractor in just this manner.

14. Contractor: Integrated AeroSystems, Inc.

A. Contractor Activities: Provide tail wheel transition training for pilots and co-pilots of FAC AC-47 aircraft. These aircraft, being tail wheel configured, present a challenge to FAC pilots, all of whom have flown only tricycle gear aircraft prior to being assigned to AC-47s. Training objective is to increase safety margins for flight crews by teaching them basic tail wheel ground handling and flying skills. Provide instrument flight proficiency refresher training for FAC AC-47 pilots, and co-pilots. Instrument flight procedures, situational awareness and instrument approaches using available navigational aids are stressed. Training is accomplished using a contractor-provided aircraft and computer-based instrument procedures training device with a database specific to North, South and Central America.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $35,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Integrated AeroSystems, Inc. was selected by the prime contractor, ARINC, as being the only company available with experience training FAC pilots in the operation of tail wheel aircraft. lAS also is familiar with the Latin American environment and has broad knowledge of counternarcotics operations. The FAC specifically requested this tail wheel transition training after an AC-47 accident based upon the very positive experience they derive from LANAS transition training in an lAS provided tail wheel aircraft. This expertise does not exist in Colombia.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risks for employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. The preponderance of all activity has been conducted at Apiay AFB. The base is heavily protected by physical barriers and well-armed military personnel. All flight activity is conducted in the general area of the base, allowing for rapid response by rescue assets should a mechanical failure occur. All flight activity is for training and flight skills standardization ONLY. No operational flights whatsoever are conducted. Management and instructor personnel are mature, experienced and thoroughly briefed on the exigencies of operating in Colombia. They conduct themselves accordingly in Bogotá and the above named FAC base. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: AC-47 tail wheel transition training and instrument proficiency refresher training was designed to make FAC pilots and co-pilots safer and more proficient in the operation of their existing aircraft. It is not envisioned as a long-term project, rather the contract should be completed by mid-2003, including identification of FAC instructor pilots to maintain standardization of existing crews and train replacements. FAC personnel will be trained in the operation of a computer-based flight-training device, which already has been turned over to the FAC.

15. Contractor: ARINC Engineering Services, LLC

A. Contractor Activities: ARINC has been under contract to support the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for counternarcotics, to improve the counter-drug operational capabilities of the Peruvian Air Force (FAP) and Colombian Air Force (FAC) . The Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) has the technical and management responsibility for insuring that counter-drug improvements are consistent with Congressional direction, DoD counter-drug mission, and the goals of the National Drug Control Strategy. ARINC was responsible to engineer, proof, assemble, and ship modification kits together with technical data, provide pilot and technician training and required logistics support services for use on A-37 airplanes involved in the A-37 Counterdrug Upgrade Sustainment and Support Program (ACUP). ARINC and its subcontractor, Basler Turbo-Conversions, Inc., have been under contract to upgrade up to, six Colombian Air Force 0-47 aircraft known as aircraft numbers 1,2,3,5,6 and 7, to AC-47T gunship configurations with a FLIR/Optical Sensor Suite and Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) capabilities. The installed systems, that are to be used in conjunction with counter-narcotics and drug interdiction operations, are capable of night operations of imagery collection and darkened cockpit operations. The ARINC subcontractor, IAS, INC, is also providing pilot transition training.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $11,000,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: ARINC accepted the contract andd acknowledging the risks involved. All ARINC travel is coordinated with the NSWCDD office to obtain the required clearances from the US Government. ARINC Employees and subcontractors stay in U.S. Embassy approved hotels and transportation is coordinated with the U.S. Milgroup and the local Air Forces of each country. This expertise does not exist in Colombia.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risk to employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. The preponderance of activity has been conducted at Barranquilla AFB, Colombia and Piura AFB in Peru, with only occasional periods in Lima and Bogotá. Each base is heavily protected by physical barriers and well-armed military personnel. All flight activity is conducted in the general area of the bases, allowing for rapid response by rescue assets should a mechanical failure occur. All flight activity is for training and flight skills standardization ONLY. No operational flights whatsoever are conducted. Management and instructor personnel are mature, experienced and thoroughly briefed on the exigencies of operating in Colombia. They conduct themselves accordingly in above named bases. Subcontractor maintenance technicians are U.S. trained Colombian and Peruvian nationals. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: ARINC has provided pilot and maintenance training to both Colombian and Peruvian Air Force personnel for the newly installed systems in the A-37 and AC-47 aircraft. Training manuals and technical publications have been delivered to each country in order for their personnel to maintain and train on the newly installed systems. ARINC provides quarterly refresher training for A-37 pilots and technicians.

16. Contractor: Northrop Grumman California Microwave Systems

A. Contractor Activities: Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, California Microwave Systems (NGSC/CMS), located at 1362 Brass Mill Rd., Belcamp, MD, was awarded a sole source contract to operate an airborne system to counter illicit drug trafficking. CMS provides program management and support for turnkey operations to include leased aircraft, pilots, operators, aircraft maintenance, ISR coordinators and mission coordinators. The system is used to conduct Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) and Communications Intelligence (COMINT) missions. The USSOUTHCOM Reconnaissance System serves as a platform for other intelligence collection sensors/analysis in support of Counter Drug Interdiction Operations for the DoD and deploys within the USSOUTHCOM theater of operations.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $8,600,000

C.. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Northrop Grumman was selected via the CECOM R2CSR contract process. This expertise does not exist in Colombia.

D.Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Moderate to High. Due to the nature of these flights over disputed territory the risk should be considered moderate to high (as was evident the February loss of an intelligence plane). MilGrp bears risk mitigation responsibility for employee personal safety, and it has recently added jungle survival training. Flight briefs and mission selection involve risk assessment by JIATF-E prior to missions. All employees adhere to U.S. Embassy guidelines for safety and security (including daily reporting). All overseas travelers received anti-terrorism force protection briefings before commencing travel. If traveling to Colombia, personnel receive the U.S. Milgrp Colombia threat and safety briefing upon arrival.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: No transfer of activities to Colombia nationals or National police.

17. Contractor: Alion, LLC

A. Contractor Activities: Alion Science and Technology formerly. named IIT (Research Institute). Consultant support for senior representatives of the Colombian Armed forces on efforts to improve theColombian government’s capability to collect and process intelligence.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $20,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Statement justifying decision to enter into agreement with Alion Science and Technology: The Director of the Alion Science and Technology Center for Latin American Affairs has extensive knowledge and experience in dealing with counternarcotics Operations in Colombia as the former Director of Operations of U.S. Southern Command. He also has a strong professional relationship with leaders of the Colombian National Police, senior military leaders, as well as senior U.S. Inter-Agency representatives in Colombia. He and his organization provide technical advice and assistance to our efforts to help the Colombians develop improved capabilities to do more things for themselves, such as intelligence tasking, collection, processing and dissemination. This provide unique experience and knowledge to Colombia’s fledgling intelligence community.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risk to employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. All work is performed on secured Colombian military facilities Bogotá, Colombia. All employees adhere to U.S. Embassy guidelines for safety and security (including daily reporting) . All overseas travelers are required to have received Anti-terrorism Force Protection Briefing Level 1 before commencing travel. If traveling to Colombia all personnel receive U.S. Milgrp Colombia Threat and Safety Briefing once in Colombia. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Project support is ongoing through FY03 and involves training Colombian military personnel to assume all responsibilities.

18. Contractor: The Rendon Group

A. Contractor Activities: The Rendon Group provides multiple echelon counterdrug public communications capability on behalf of the Department of Defense in accordance with its authorities, to assist the Republic of Colombia’s Ministry of Defense (MOD) [General Command, Armed Forces, and Colombian National Police] to successfully implement "Plan Colombia." The Contractor shall not directly author or produce any public communications products for Colombian MOD. The development of the Colombian communications capability will be achieved, primarily, by allowing the Colombians to learn on-the-job from real-time illustrative assistance provided by the contractor during numerous communications activities and events over the 12-month period. There will be many audiences for the counterdrug public communications products developed and utilized by Colombia under this program, but none of the products developed or proposed under this contract are to target U.S. audience.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $2,400,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: The Rendon Group was selected via the GSA process for this effort. This expertise does not exist in Colombia.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Risk to employee personal safety and potential for involvement in hostilities are minimal. All work is preformed at secured Colombian and USG facilities in Bogotá, Colombia. All employees adhere to U.S. Embassy guidelines for safety and security (including daily reporting). All overseas travelers are required to have received anti-terrorism force protection before commencing travel. Travelers to Colombia receive U.S. Milgrp Colombia threat and safety briefing upon arrival.’ -Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Colombian Defense personnel are being trade to take over full responsibility for this project.

19. Contractor: ACS Defense

A. Contractor Activities: This contract provides logistic support to USG personnel and operational assets deployed to the Embassy Country Team Initiatives.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $517,035

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Contracted support provides flexibility to surge to meet dynamic operational support requirements and provides specific expertise needed. Use of contracts supports National Presidential Directives and DOD policies for maximizing use of outsourcing to private industry. Elaborate State Department NASD 38 procedures to increase USG footprint do not apply to contractors.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Personnel are directly tied into U.S. MILGP and benefit from all force protection and force tracking measures put in place to ensure their safety. Therefore, personnel risks for contractors are equal to that of all other USG employees. Personnel are compensated for working in an environment of increased risk commensurate with entitlement received by USG counterparts. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Not applicable. Support provided is to deployed USG personnel and operational assets only. When assets and personnel are no longer required support will be reallocated or terminated.

20. Contractor: INS

A. Contractor Activities: This contract provides logistic support to USG personnel and operational assets deployed to U.S. Embassy Country Team initiatives.

B.Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $196,000

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Contracted support provides flexibility to surge to meet dynamic operational support requirements and provides specific expertise needed. Use of contracts supports National Presidential Directives and DOD policies for maximizing use of outsourcing to private industry. Elaborate State Department NASD 3-8 procedures to increase USG footprint do not apply to contractors.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Personnel are directly tied into U.S. MilGp and benefit from all force protection and force tracking measures put in place to ensure their safety. Therefore, personnel risks for contractors are equal to that of all other USG employees. Personnel are compensated for working in an environment of increased risk commensurate with entitlement received by USG counterparts. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Not applicable. Support provided is to deployed USG personnel and operational assets only. When assets and personnel are no longer required support will be reallocated or terminated.

21. Contractor: Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC)

A. Contractor Activities: Imagery Analysis

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $255,335

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Contracted support provides flexibility to surge to meet dynamic operational support requirements and provides specific expertise needed. Use of contracts supports National Presidential Directives and DOD policies for maximizing use of outsourcing to private industry. Elaborate State Department NASD 38 procedures to increase USG footprint do not apply to contractors.

D. Assessment of Risk to -the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Personnel are directly tied into U.S. MILGP and benefit from all force protection and force tracking measures put in place to ensure their safety. Therefore, personnel risks for contractors are equal to that of all other USG employees. Personnel are compensated for working in an environment ‘of increased risk commensurate with entitlement received by USG counterparts. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: Not Applicable. Support provided is to USG Operations. When operations are no longer conducted support will be reallocated or terminated.

22. Contractor: ManTech

A. Contractor Activities: Funds the establishment, expansion and sustainment of the CONUS and OCONUS system. Establishes and maintains DoD and drug law enforcement agency (DLEA) data base connectivity with other CONUS C4I data management centers. Provides interfaces and connectivity for the National Capital Region DLEA headquarters and intelligence agencies. Supports real-time DoD and DLEA counterdrug operational efforts in Latin America and the Caribbean by providing a complex suite of hardware, software, dedicated secure voice and data. Provides communications and imagery equipment designed to improve the effectiveness of multi-agency, multi-national counterdrug source suppression teams. Also provides for system security, administration, oversight and training for users. Sustains real-time network management. The Cooperating Nations Information Exchange System (CNIES) provides for the exchange of sanitized, unclassified information between U.S. assets and cooperating nations involved in end game activities.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $2,146,692

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services:

  • Requirement for Command Management System (CMS), is documented in USCINCSO Requirements Statement (RS) 1-90, dated 1 March 1990, and validated by Director of the Joint Staff message dated 031339Z May 90.
  • Coordination with Department of State (DoS) concerning CMS Proof-of-Concept configuration is documented in DoS memorandum, IM/SO/FO/FD, dated January 8, 1991. Weekly interagency meetings coordinated requirements and support.
  • Department of Defense (DoD) Intelligence Systems Support Office (ISSO) concurred with a U.S. Southern Command proposal to assign program responsibility to the U.S. Army’s Program Executive Office for Command and Control Systems (PEO-CCS), now PEO (C3S), on 22 January 1991. The Assistant Secretary of Defense ASD approved PEO-CCS’s request for establishing an Army Program Office via a 29 July 1991 ASD (DARD-RP) memorandum.
  • The Assistant Secretary of Defense for C3I’s June 18, 1991 memorandum to the Chairman, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, certified successful prototype proof of concept.
  • In support of PEO-CCS’ Program Manager (PM), Counternarcotics Command and Management System (CNCMS) U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command tasked MTISC for integrated logistics support under USACECOM’s contract DAAB10-89-D-0503. In November 1998, the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for RDA approved transition of CNCMS sustainment responsibility from PEO (C3S) to USACECOM, thus eliminating PEO (C3S) involvement. The MTISC currently supports under USACECOM’s contract DAABO7-98-A-600l.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Personnel are directly tied into U.S. MILGP and benefit from all force protection and force tracking measures put in place to ensure their safety. Therefore, personnel risks for contractors are equal to that of all other USG employees. Personnel are compensated for working in an environment of increased risk commensurate with entitlement received by USG counterparts. Nevertheless, Colombia remains a dangerous country, and all counterdrug activities will be potential targets for violence.

E. Plan to Transfer. Activities to the Government of Colombia: The preponderance of the work performed by MTISC is within diplomatic sites wherein a U.S. security clearance is mandatory. There are no plan for transfer of responsibilities to host nation personnel.

23. Contractor: ACS Defense

A. Contractor Activities: Provides support for (1) senior CD logistician in support of Plan Colombia.

B. Value of Payments Made in FY ‘02: $237,810.56

C. Statement Justifying the Decision to Contract for Services: Contracted support provides flexibility to surge to meet dynamic operational support requirements and provides specific expertise needed. Use of contracts supports National Presidential Directives and DOD policies for maximizing use of outsourcing to private industry. Elaborate State Department NASD 38 procedures to increase USG footprint do not apply to contractors.

D. Assessment of Risk to the Safety of Contractor Employees: Low. Personnel are directly tied into U.S. MILGP and benefit from all force protection and force-tracking measures put in place to ensure their safety. Therefore, personnel risks for contractors are equal to that of all other USG employees. Personnel are compensated for working in an environment of increased risk commensurate with entitlement received by USG counterparts.

E. Plan to Transfer Activities to the Government of Colombia: No plan to transfer this function to Colombian Nationals.

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