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Last Updated:8/3/00
State Department report to Congress, July 27, 2000

The State Department submitted this report to Congress on July 27, as ordered by the conference committee report for the Colombia aid package legislation (available in Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format). (The House-Senate conference committee required "a report on the proposed uses of all funds under this heading on a country-by-country basis for each proposed program, project or activity." It only includes the State Department portion of the aid package -- about 90% of the aid, the rest is Pentagon aid -- so some items in the aid package show up with lower amounts and others are missing entirely.)


COLOMBIA

1. SUPPORT FOR THE PUSH INTO SOUTHERN COLOMBIA

Train and Equip CNBNs

The Department plans to use $7 million to provide weapons, ammunition and communications equipment to the three Counternarcotics Battalions (CN BNs) and the Counternarcotics Brigade (CN BDE) Headquarters. The first Counternarcotics Battalion has been formed and trained. This funding will provide weapons to the second and third Counternarcotics Battalions and ammunition and equipment for all three. Additionally, it will be used to provide weapons and ammunition to the Counternarcotics Brigade Headquarters element. Funding may also be used to provide communications equipment to the Battalions and Brigade Headquarters. All communications equipment procured for the Colombian military and police will be coordinated to ensure interoperability.

Army Counternarcotics Battalion UH-1N Program

The Department plans to use $60 million to inspect, refurbish, configure, deploy and operate up to 15 additional UH- lN helicopters, currently in storage, for the Army Counternarcotics Battalion. These UH-lNs, together with the 18 UH-lNs already in country, will enable the CN BDE to conduct larger scale airmobile operations. Current plans have all 33 UH-lNs operational by the time the third CN BN is trained and ready for field operations around June 2001. These additional helicopters, together with the additional Huey IIs and UH-60s, will require the training of additional pilots for the Colombian Armed Forces. The balance of the funding, if any, will be used to procure and put in place stocks of required spare parts and components; pay for additional pilot and mechanic training for the Colombian Army (COLAR) ; and provide additional logistical, maintenance, infrastructure, operations technical advice/assistance, and other support to the COLAR.

Army Counternarcotics Battalion UH-60 Black Hawk Program

The Department plans to use $208 million to procure up to sixteen UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters for the COLAR through the Defense Security Cooperation Agency's (DSCA) Foreign Military Sales (EMS) program. DSCA coordination will integrate the additional UH-60 helicopters into the existing COLAR aviation force structure. This all-inclusive package is intended to include training (pilot, mechanic, and other aviation specialists) , operational support and maintenance (including spare parts) costs for two years, armament, ground support equipment, and technical assistance. The UH-60 helicopters will enable the COLAR to engage in longer-range missions and missions in less secure areas. The first UH-60 should be available to the COLAR approximately 14 months after the contract is finalized. Delivery should take place at the rate of two-to- three aircraft per month.

Army Counternarcotics Battalion UH-1H Huey II Program

The Department plans to use $60 million to convert up to 30 UH-lH helicopters into Huey II helicopters. Costs include the conversion kits, installation costs and transport costs. Funds permitting, this program will also provide training for additional pilots and mechanics, acquire special mission equipment, and provide logistical support for the completed Huey II's and cover associated operations and maintenance costs. Final field deployment depends on the speed of conversion, availability of trained pilots and crews, and the identification of sustainment funds (i.e., spare parts and fuel).

Sustain Army Counternarcotics Battalions

The Department plans to use $6 million to provide fuel, rations, ammunition, spare parts and other equipment to sustain the operations of the three counternarcotics battalions and the brigade headquarters. Funds permitting, this program will also support other units conducting counternarcotics operations or units in support of the Counternarcotics Battalions and Brigade Headquarters that have passed the human rights vetting process.

Forward Infrastructure Development

The Department plans to provide $3 million for construction projects in support of the Counternarcotics Battalions, the Brigade Headquarters and the COLAR aviation units. These projects will develop forward infrastructure that will enable the Counternarcotics Battalions to expand their area of operation. This includes development of forward operating sites to provide the ability to refuel and rearm tactical mobility helicopters in the field. Possible locations include Larandia, Tolemaida, San Jose del Guaviare, Tres Esquinas, Villa Carzon, and others as may be operationally required.

Force Protection Enhancements

The Department plans to use $4 million for security upgrades and projects for all counternarcotics bases and facilities. Priority will be given to the Counternarcotics Battalions and the Brigade Headquarters, their facilities and forward operating sites, and the protection of high value assets (i.e., helicopters, etc.). Upgrades will include design, construction, materials, field fortifications, intelligence gathering/security systems, and training.

Logistical Support

The Department plans to use $4.4 million to improve the Colombian Military's (COLMIL) logistical system. We will help the COLMIL rapidly upgrade that portion of their system that will support the Counternarcotics Brigade and Battalions and supporting units. This program will improve the Colombian logistical/supply system by providing logistical control hardware and software, overhauling the fuel shipping and storage system, overhauling the spare parts supply system, and logistical training for those Colombians who manage the system. This program will also provide for limited acquisition of material handling equipment and infrastructure development. Additionally, this will facilitate end use monitoring requirements.

Army Counternarcotics Battalion Organic Intelligence

The Department plans to use $9 million to procure three (3) Schweizer aircraft for the Colombian Air Force (FAC) to provide intelligence information in support of the Counternarcotics Brigade and Battalions. These aircraft will complement the existing Schweizers already in country. These aircraft will have Forward Looking Infrared Radar (FLIR) and a direction- finding/intercept capability and will be used to locate traffickers' cdmmunications sites, observe trafficker activities at night, locate laboratories, and provide Colombian counternarcotics forces early warning of attacks by drug traffickers and their armed associates.

Training for Senior Commanders

The Department plans to use $1.1 million for Colombian senior commanders, brigade level and higher, to attend specialized senior-level seminars, exercises, and war games. This training will focus on strategic thinking, joint doctrine, and inculcating respect for human rights into all aspects of military doctrine. The training will reinforce many of the reforms recommended by a Department of Defense contractor studying the Colombian Military.

Army Counternarcotics Battalion Communications

The Department plans to use $3 million to establish a secure communications network for the Counternarcotics Battalions, aviation units, and Brigade Headquarters. This network will also connect the CN BDE with the national command system. All communications equipment procured for the COLMIL and Colombian National Police (CNP) will be coordinated to ensure interoperability. Funds permitting, this program will extend secure communications to other vetted and cleared units participating in counternarcotics operations or supporting the CN BN and CN BDE.

Alternative Development in Southern Colombia

The Department plans to use $10 million to provide the social and economic incentives to assist farmers and communities to eliminate coca and develop sustainable licit alternatives in six municipalities in the department of Putumayo. Over five years, USAID will contribute to the voluntary abandonment of 6,000 hectares of small-farmer production. This will directly impact approximately 2,650 farm families, or 13,250 persons. Initially, the effort will be focused on the municipalities of Puerto Guzman, Villa Garzon, and Puerto Caicedo, with rapid expansion into the four remaining municipalities. The activity promotes the transition of small-farmer production from illicit coca to licit agricultural and livestock alternatives through provision of modern production technologies, processing, credit, marketing, and assistance to producer associations. Additional non-agricultural activities may be added in Putumayo, including vocational training, technical workshops, and food security activities to assist families displaced by the spraying of coca crops to transition to alternative productive activities. In more remote coca-producing areas, licit production will include agro-forestry and tree cropping, as well as programs tailored to the indigenous population. The activity will facilitate access to improved schools, health services, potable water, sewerage, and electricity in collaboration with community organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and municipal governments. Alternative development activities will be coordinated with interdiction and law enforcement efforts that disrupt narcotrafficking, eradicate coca by spraying, and destabilize the market for coca leaf and products.

Temporary Emergency Resettlement and Employment

The Department plans to use $15 million for both emergency and longer-term assistance to persons displaced in southern Colombia. Emergency Assistance will be delivered through the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration of the State Department (PRM) to support International Organizations' (IOs') and Non-Governmental Organizations' (NGO's) efforts to provide emergency assistance to internally displaced persons and those who may cross borders and seek refugee status. PRM will also support 10 and NGO capacity-building programs with the Government of Colombia (GOC) . Activities will be closely coordinated with the GOC. Mid- to longer-term assistance will be delivered by USAID through IOs and U.S. NGOs working with Colombian counterparts to provide health, education and shelter to better assist the displaced to reintegrate into the economic, social and political life of the country. Activities will also include employment opportunities, vocational training and income generation, as well as social communication campaigns and small community projects in receptor communities that are often poor and lack basic infrastructure. USAID will utilize a municipal- based approach in coordination with local leaders to stabilize the receptor communities, promote democratic participation, and support access to state social services such as health, education, and justice. The program will increase community stability through strengthened local capacity to provide basic social services to vulnerable groups, and by the increased presence of international organizations to assist in the return or relocation of displaced persons. Funds may also be used for GOC humanitarian assistance activities for displaced persons.

2. SUPPORT FOR INTERDICTION EFFORTS

Upgrade Colombian Air Force OV-1O Aircraft

The Department plans to use $15 million to fund an existing FMS case for the upgrade of up to 11 Colombian Air Force OV-10 aircraft for counternarcotics air interdiction missions. Upgrades will include the overhaul and upgrade of the 11 OV-10s, service life extension program, overhaul and upgrade of the T-76 engines, avionics upgrades, installation of new propellers and exhaust modifications, and instruments modifications for night vision goggle (NVG) compatibility.

Upgrade Aircraft for Night Operations

The Department plans to use $1.9 million to assist the Colombian Navy/Coast Guard in analyzing littoral and maritime surveillance requirements and to assist them with the procurement and installation of an appropriate suite of sensors for installation in their existing aircraft. Additionally, communications will be standardized to ensure interoperability with Colombian and U.S Forces.

Airfield Upgrades

The Department plans on providing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers $8 million for airfield upgrades for interceptor aircraft. Airfields planned for upgrades include Tres Esquinas, Marandua, Larandia, Apiay, and others to be determined based on changes in narcotics trafficking patterns. Upgrades will include runway improvements, ramp space, additional aprons for parking, and security upgrades in support of the air interdiction program. Together these upgrades will extend the range of Colombia' s air interdiction program.

Upgrade U.S. Customs Service P-3 Aircraft Radar Programs

The Department plans on providing $68 million to the United States Customs Service (USCS) to fund upgrades for radars for USCS P-3 AEW aircraft. Currently, all four Customs P-3 AEW aircraft are configured with the APS-138 radar, which is approximately 25 years old. To keep current with the U.S. Air Force (USAF) early warning radar system (APS-145) and to be able to use USAF maintenance facilities for the APS 145, USCS must upgrade from the APS-138 to the APS-145.

Support for Colombian Air Interdiction Program

The Department plans to use $19.5 million to continue support for the A-37 upgrade program initiated for Colombia and Peru with funds provided from the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999. This support includes completing the upgrades to the A-37 aircraft, providing sustainment, and providing operational fuel, spare parts and ammunition for the A-37's, OV-l0's and Tucano aircraft for air interdiction missions.

Support for Colombian Riverine Interdiction Program

The Department plans to use $12 million to procure critical replacement outboard engines, other spare parts, communications equipment, and fuel for Colombian Marine counternarcotic forces conducting riverine interdiction operations. Additionally, we will provide fuel for coastal maritime operations by the Colombian naval forces conducting interdiction operations.

Ammunition for Colombian Riverine Interdiction Support

The Department plans to use $2 million to procure ammunition for the Colombian Marines conducting riverine counternarcotics interdiction operations, and limited amounts of ammunition for the Colombian Navy for coastal interdiction operations.

Colombian Navy Operations Infrastructure Support

The Department plans to use $1 million to contract for improvements to Colombian Naval pier facilities for the recently received USCG 82' Coastal Patrol Boats.

OFAC Entitlements

The Department plans to use $2 million to assist the Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Asset Controls (OFAC) to expand the critical U.S. and bilateral sanction program against Colombian kingpins and other specially designated narcotraffickers (SDNT) under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (TEEPA) and the Foreign Narcotic Kingpin Designation Act (FNKDA) legislation. This funding will provide personnel and program costs.

3. SUPPORT FOR THE COLOMBIAN NATIONAL POLICE

Secure Communications

The Department plans to use $3 million to procure ground and airborne communications systems. Final equipment purchases will be coordinated with MILGP Colombia to ensure compatibility with Colombian Armed Forces.

Weapons and Ammunition

The Department plans to use $3 million to procure weapons and ammunition, including for ground and air operations and base defense.

UH-60 Black Hawk Procurement and Support

The Department plans to use $26 million to procure two UH- 60 Black Hawk helicopters for the Colombian National Police (CNP) through the DSCA EMS process. These two helicopters will complement the six that were procured and delivered to the CNP through the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999. A DSCA-coordinated site survey team will make recommendations regarding the incorporation of the UH- 60 helicopters into the existing CNP force structure and consider the requirements for COLAR acquisition of UH-60 helicopters in building the training and support packages. This all-inclusive program includes funding for operational support and maintenance (including spare parts) costs for two years, as well as training (pilot, mechanic, and other aviation specialists), armament, ground support equipment, and technical assistance. The addition of UH-60 helicopters will better enable the CNP to accompany the COLAR on its UH-60 supported missions.

Enhance Logistical Support

The Department plans to use $2 million for fuel and fuel handling charges for the CNP, provide training and equipment to improve the CNP logistical system and integrate NAS and CNP financial management, procurement, and inventory control/end-use monitoring systems.

CNP Forward Operating Capability and Force Protection

The Department plans to use $5 million in conjunction with the CNP Border Base Construction and the Airfield Security funding to construct forward operating locations (FOLs) in order to provide the CNP with the ability to operate under a secure environment without the necessity to defend a large number of bases with its limited manpower. This funding may include procurement for an additional cargo aircraft, contracted airlift support, forward area refueling points, and additional auxiliary fuel tanks. FOLs will be determined following completion of a CNP construction review.

CNP Border Bases Construction

The Department plans to use $5 million in conjunction with the Force Protection and Airfield Security funding to provide the CNP with a small number of permanent bases, along with a larger number of transient facilities. The permanent bases will extend CNP presence to key border areas. The transient facilities would usually consist of low-maintenance barracks and heliport/refueling facilities that require no, or limited, permanent presence and would be located on secure Colombian military bases. The objective is to have the CNP reach any part of the country, safely and securely. Sites will be determined following completion of a CNP construction review.

Additional CNP Airmobile Unit

The Department plans to use $2 million to procure additional airmobile equipment, communications equipment, training, operations support and construction of airmobile headquarters and barracks. These airmobile units are critical to the coordination of CNP and COLAR operations.

Upgrade CNP Aviation Facilities

The Department plans to use $8 million to provide major structural repairs and a new apron at Guaymaral. A hangar expansion at Mariquita that will include shops, classrooms, and barracks will also be funded. Funding will also include a portion of a new CNP air service headquarters and hangar with ramp at El Dorado airport. Funds permitting, this program will also support other CNP aviation facilities, to include forward operating sites.

Additional Spray Aircraft

The Department plans to use $20 million to procure additional commercial agricultural spray aircraft, and of those funds, not less than $12 million will be allocated for procurement, training, and operations of Ayers 2RT-65 agricultural spray aircraft. We intend to use the notwithstanding authorities contained in Section 481 (a) (4) of the FAA of 1961 (P.L. 87-195) for such procurement. We may also activate additional OV-10 spray aircraft for use in Colombia. Funds permitting, we will procure additional multi-spectral digital imaging systems (MDIS) to enhance spray capability. MDIS provides the capability to photograph coca growing areas and produce imagery that depicts coca, for use for targeting, mission planning, and verification purposes.

Upgrade Existing CNP Airplanes (including FLIR)

The Department plans to use $5 million to upgrade the avionics in up to 24 Huey II helicopters and two Bell 212's. Funding will also be used to procure armoring and spare parts for up to 15 Huey II's and possibly improved CNP OV-l0 FLIR equipment to enhance the reconnaissance, detection, and interdiction capability of that aircraft. Steps will be taken to ensure communications interoperability with COLAR and Colombian Air Force aircraft and headquarters.

Upgrade (12) UH-1H Helicopters to Huey II Configuration

The Department plans to use $20.6 million to: (1) procure and ship conversion kits, and provide technical assistance for the CNP to conduct five upgrades, which they intend to do 'in- house"; (2) establish and administer contract action for up to an additional seven upgrades to be accomplished by a U.S. contractor; and (3) deploy and logistically support all the completed Huey II's. Costs include the conversion kits, installation costs and transport costs. Funds permitting, this program will also provide training for additional pilots and to acquire special mission equipment.

Sustainment and Operations.

The Department plans to use $5 million to support and sustain CNP air and ground counternarcotics operations with fuel, ammunition, rations and other equipment. This support will allow the CNP to increase its capability to support and augment interdiction and aerial eradication efforts in Southern Colombia. It will also allow for high volume surge operations against large-scale coca cultivation in areas not subject to heavy spraying up to this point (most notably Putumayo)

Training for Pilots and Mechanics

The Department plans to use $2 million for training pilots and mechanics. This will focus on the additional training required by increased aircraft being provided and assist the CNP in expanding their pilot and mechanic pool.

Airfield Security

The Department plans to use $2 million in conjunction with Force Protection and CNP Border Base Construction projects to ensure that the Colombian National Police are able to provide support and security to their forces conducting counternarcotics operations anywhere in the country. Base defense unit upgrade is critical due to the guerrillas' ability to mass forces at remote CNP locations. This upgrade will include design, materials, construction, lighting, sensors, and additional intelligence support to track movement and location of hostile forces, as well as additional equipment and training for CNP base security forces. This complements funding for security projects provided by the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental AppropriatiQns Act, 1999. Airfield locations will be determined following completion of a CNP construction review.

Enhanced Eradication

The Department plans to use $4 million to purchase additional equipment, fuel, and herbicide and meet other operating expenses required to expand aerial eradication.

Spare Parts

The Department plans to use $3 million for spare parts for Bell 212 helicopters, Huey II helicopters, UH-60 helicopters, C- 26 engines and other CNP aircraft, to enhance their overall spares inventory.

4. SUPPORT FOR ALTERNATIVE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN COLOMBIA

Environmental Programs

The Department plans to use $2.5 million to assist the GOC to promote sustainable production for alternative crops through agro-forestry systems particularly suited to the financial and ecological conditions of small farms in remote tropical lowland regions. Indigenous peoples inhabit four of USAID's eight target departments. A number of parks, forest preserves and indigenous reserves overlap, are adjacent, or are close to each other. The protection of indigenous territorial rights, therefore, frequently also results in the protection of parks. The activity will finance integrated pest management training of producer groups, promote sustainable forest management, and promote a coordinated cross-border environmental management program dealing with the need for mitigation actions arising from coca-related activities in southern Colombia and northern Ecuador.

Voluntary Eradication Programs

The Department plans to use $30 million to provide the social and economic incentives to assist farmers and communities to eliminate coca and develop sustainable licit alternatives. Over five years, USAID will contribute to the voluntary abandonment of 7,000 hectares of small farmer coca (2,000 in Caqueta, 2,000 in Bolivar, and 3,000 in Norte de Santander). This will directly impact approximately 3,000 farm families, or 15,000 people. The activity promotes the transition of small farmer production from illicit coca to licit agricultural and livestock alternatives through provision of modern production technologies, processing, credit, marketing, and assistance to producer associations. In more remote coca-producing areas, licit production will include agro-forestry and tree cropping, as well as programs tailored to the indigenous population. The activity will facilitate access to improved schools, health services, potable water, sewerage, and electricity in collaboration with community organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and municipal governments. Alternative development activities will be coordinated with interdiction and law enforcement efforts that disrupt narcotrafficking, eradicate coca by spraying, and destabilize the market for coca leaf and products.

Assistance to Local Governments

Includes "Community Level Alternative Development"

The Department plans to use $22 million for assistance to local governments and community-level alternative development. Sound local governance is essential to building a more transparent, responsive and participatory democracy. Good local governance is also fundamental to carrying out alternative development, and displaced persons programs. First priority will be municipalities where alternative development is active, and will coordinate with programs for displaced persons. Other democracy programs, such as human rights and administration of justice, will also be closely coordinated with this activity. The project will assist civil society in the target municipalities to improve its participation in setting priorities and making key decisions through the use of the wide range of legal participatory mechanisms that presently exist under Colombian law. Activities in each municipality will improve efficiency and accountability in municipal operations through greater transparency of municipal functions and more responsible citizen oversight of municipal performance. In addition, technical assistance and support will be provided to popularly-elected local government officials to improve their capacity to fulfill their functions. The local governance program will offer grants to support social infrastructure (e.g., schools, health posts, and community centers) as a practical mechanism for activities aimed at strengthening local governance on both the civil society and the municipal government sides.

Assistance for Internally Displaced Persons

In parallel with the similar program in southern Colombia, the Department plans to use $22.5 million for both emergency and longer-term assistance to persons displaced in the northern and central areas of Colombia. Emergency assistance will be delivered through the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration of the State Department (PRM) to support International Organizations' (IOs') and Non-Governmental Organizations' (NGOs') efforts to provide emergency assistance to internally displaced persons. PRM will also support 10 and NGO capacity- building programs with the Government of Colombia (GOC) Activities will be closely coordinated with the GOC. Mid- to longer-term assistance will be delivered by USAID through IOs and U.S. NGOs working with Colombian counterparts to provide health, education and shelter in a post-emergency situation. Activities will also include employment opportunities, vocational training and income generation, as well as social communication campaigns and small community projects to reduce resentment by receptor communities that are often already poor and lack basic infrastructure. USAID will utilize a municipal- based approach in coordination with local leaders to stabilize the receptor communities, promote democratic participation, and support access to state social services such as health, education, and justice. The program will increase community stability through strengthened local capacity to provide basic social services to vulnerable groups, and by the increased presence of international organizations to assist in the return or relocation of displaced persons. Funds may also be used for GOC humanitarian assistance activities for displaced persons.

AID Operating Expenses in Colombia

The Department plans to use $4 million to increase the USAID operating expenses approved in the FY 2000 and FY 2001 budgets, allowing for the acquisition and support of staff required to manage the increased program.

Community-Level Alternative Development

Included in "Assistance to Local Governments"

5. SUPPORT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND JUDICIAL REFORM IN COLOMBIA

Protection of Human Rights Workers

The Department plans to use $4 million to protect human rights workers as part of a broader USAID initiative to improve investigation and prosecution of human rights abuses and thereby reduce the impunity of those who violate human rights. The USAID protection program will complement the program initiated by Colombia's Ministry of the Interior and local NGOs,.which provides basic protective measures such as bodyguards, radio communication networks, bullet-proof vests, armed vehicles, metal detectors, and reinforced doors for the human rights organizations, their workers, and the country's labor unions.

Strengthen Human Rights Institutions

The Department plans to use $7 million to provide technical assistance and support to GOC agencies and civil society organizations working in the human rights area. The program will improve the capacity of major human rights institutions and groups to make citizens aware of their rights, document human rights violations, and monitor individual cases. Coalitions between and among the GOC and civil society will also be supported in order to remove the obstacles to improving the human rights situation in Colombia. In this way, information can be shared and made public, human rights policy can be promoted, and efforts can be better coordinated. Assistance will be complemented by outreach educational activities to citizens to inform them of their rights and responsibilities within a democracy and how to take preventive action or recourse in case of violations. USAID will also focus on improving the information systems and monitoring mechanisms currently being employed by the GOC and civil society organizations to report abuses and monitor investigation and prosecution by the responsible government authorities.

Establish CNP/Fiscalia Human Rights Units

The Department plans to use $25 million to establish and train new "vetted" Colombian law enforcement task forces (and expand one existing task force) specializing in the investigation and prosecution of alleged human rights violations, to cross-train other existing "vetted" Colombian law enforcement task forces in the unique aspects of conducting criminal investigations and prosecutions related to human rights violations, and to provide necessary operational resources to these Colombian law enforcement task forces. Modeled after the highly successful U.S. organized crime task forces, these Colombian law enforcement task forces consist of trained prosecutors and investigators who work in a task force setting to investigate and prosecute those alleged to have committed or directed serious human rights abuses or related criminal offenses. In addition to the specialized human rights task forces, other Colombian law enforcement task forces specializing in anti-corruption, asset forfeiture/money laundering, and counternarcotics will be cross-trained on the unique aspects related to the investigation and prosecution of human rights- related cases. All members of all of the task forces undergo extensive background checks, including polygraph examinations, and receive special training both in Colombia and in the U.S. Training includes techniques for investigating and prosecution complex criminal cases, with emphasis on the unique aspects of human rights-related cases. Training will include instruction on international human rights norms and monitoring, international humanitarian law, and the roles and responsibilities of other governmental entities and non- operational resources, including operational costs associated with unit deployment and travel.

Judicial System Policy Reform

The Department plans to use $1 million to reinforce the USAID program to promote policy dialogue and informed public debate necessary to permit needed reforms in the judicial system as well as to substantially increase public trust. In addition to direct work with the Superior Judicial Council and the Ministry of Justice, the activity promotes participation of interested Colombian NGOs and universities in the promotion of policy reforms, procedural changes, or reinterpretation of current law. As a step towards improved case management, the program will assist the Ministry of Justice to commission an annual evaluation of the status and disposition of cases brought before the judicial system.

Criminal Code Reform

The Department plans to use $1.5 million to support Colombia's transition to a modern accusatorial system of criminal justice. Funding will assist Colombia in implementing and modifying, as necessary, its recently enacted criminal procedure code, criminal code and related statutes. Implementation will include: (1) introduction and training in oral, accusatory, and transparent trial procedures in which an accused is afforded the right to confront the evidence against him/her; and (2) adoption and implementation of effective investigative techniques, which provide prosecutors and investigators the ability to undertake investigative activities, pursuant to appropriate judicial authorization, without revealing the existence of the investigation to its target. Such reforms are essential for Colombia to develop the capacity to confront serious crimes, including sophisticated criminal conspiracies in the areas of narcotics, money laundering, human rights abuses, and corruption. In addition to substantive and procedural code reform and implementation activities, this initiative will include public education programs through governmental and non-governmental entities and professional associations to ensure due process and transparency and to gain public trust and confidence in the fairness, responsiveness, and effectiveness of the system of criminal justice in Colombia. Support provided will include expert consultation and conferences in the U.S. and Colombiaand public education programs.

Prosecutor Training

The Department plans to use $4 million to expand the present program in support of Colombia's criminal courts, the Prosecutor General, and the Attorney General to improve their timeliness and performance in investigation, indictment, prosecution, and adjudication of criminal cases. This is particularly important in light of the recent legal and procedural changes that require greater rigor on the part of Colombian prosecutors, especially in human rights cases. Increased court efficiency is an important factor in reducing the large numbers of persons incarcerated that are awaiting trial or sentencing (approximately half of the prison population) . Prosecutors in the field are primarily responsible for investigating common crime, but rarely for serious human rights violations. The expanded program will include training in case management and organizational teamwork, material and logistical support (including security/protection equipment) ; and targeted programs for improving administration of justice in Putumayo and other regions. Among the areas of emphasis will be establishment of consensus on the basic guidelines of criminal justice, including definition of the elements of guilt, standards of proof, and procedures for presenting different types of evidence in criminal cases.

Judges Training

The Department plans to use $3.5 million to train Colombian trial judges in conducting trials using the new oral, accusatory criminal trial procedures. They will also be trained in specialized subject areas, such as money laundering, asset forfeiture, and organized crime, as well as in the new investigative techniques used by prosecutors, the probative value of oral evidence at trial, and selected legal and evidentiary topics. This training will assist them in making proper determinations of law and fact under the new system, such as applying a probable cause ("prueba minima") standard in accepting or rejecting indictments. In addition, the Consejo Superior de Judicatura that oversees the Colombian court system will be offered advice from U.S. tribal justice experts to assist in the Consejo's work with Colombia's indigenous peoples' justice systems.

Casa de Justicia Judicial Training

The Department plans to use $1 million for eight additional Casas de Justicia (Justice Houses) to make community legal aid and mediation services broadly available to ordinary Colombians. These USAID-supported centers, presently in nine poor municipalities (expanding to 27 municipalities total in 2000), will include a public defender, an ombudsman, mediators and conciliators, a prosecutor, and in some cases, social service officers.

Public Defender Program

The Department plans to use $2 million to fund training and management processes to mobilize additional public defenders and place them in high priority areas around the country, particularly in Putumayo and in the various Casas de Justicia elsewhere, both for legal representation and to conduct their human rights duties. This will improve the fairness of the judicial system and assist the GOC to assure due process of law and adequate representation of poor defendants by retaining a trained cadre of public defenders within a framework that ensures quality performance. It will also better enable public defenders to fulfill their role as human rights promoters.

Asset Forfeiture-Money-Laundering Task Force

The Department plans to use $29 million to support an Asset Forfeiture-Money Laundering Task Force ($15 million), and an Organized Financial Crime Program ($14 million) as follows.

Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Task Force

The Department plans to use a portion of these funds to establish and train new "vetted" Colombian law enforcement task forces (and expand the one existing task force) specializing in the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and other financial crimes and the forfeiture of the instrumentalities and ill-gotten gains of narcotics and related crimes. Similar to the Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Task Force, these units will be modeled after the highly successful U.S. organized crime task forces, and will consist of trained prosecutors and investigators who will work in a task force setting. All members of the Units will undergo extensive background checks, including polygraph examinations, and receive special training both in Colombia and in the U.S. Training will include techniques necessary to conduct specialized financial investigations and prosecutions, management of complex financial information, as well as other sophisticated investigative techniques. The Colombian Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Units will work closely with U.S. law enforcement agencies to develop complex investigations in support of the Bilateral and Multilateral Case Initiatives. Support will include the provision of training, technical assistance, equipment, and necessary operational resources.

Anti-Corruption Program

The Department plans to use a portion of these funds to establish and train new "vetted" Colombian law enforcement task forces (and expand the one existing task force) specializing in the investigation and prosecution of public corruption and related criminal offenses. Modeled after the highly successful U.S. organized crime task forces, the Colombian Anti-Corruption Units will consist of trained prosecutors and investigators who will work in a task force setting. All members of the Units will undergo extensive background checks, including polygraph examinations. Training will be conducted in both Colombia and the U.S. and will include techniques necessary to conduct specialized corruption-related investigations and prosecutions, as well as other sophisticated investigative techniques. Support will include the provision of training, technical assistance, equipment, and necessary operational resources.

The USAID component of the Anti-Corruption Program will strengthen GOC and municipal financial controls and increase citizen oversight of public resources. The program will establish standards and procedures for internal controls; train internal audit staff, and assist ministry and municipal internal control units to adopt modern internal audit techniques. The program will provide grants to NGOs to organize awareness campaigns and support citizen groups at the local level to form oversight committees, as well as provide them with technical assistance.

Asset Management Program

The Department plans to use a portion of these funds to assist the Colombian Government, through the Ministry of Justice, in developing effective systems for managing and disposing of seized and forfeited assets, similar to the asset management program administered by the U.S. Marshals Service in the U.S. Assistance will include a review of the current operations of the Colombian asset management system and the conduct of a needs assessment; and the development of appropriate protocols, policies and procedures to establish an effective property management and disposal program for the particular types of assets targeted for forfeiture under the laws of Colombia (e.g., agricultural holdings). Assistance will also include training and program implementation and may include planning, development or procurement of secure facilities and equipment for the safeguarding of assets in custody.

Financial Crime Program/Organized Financial Crime

The Department plans to use a portion of these funds to support programs to combat organized financial crime in Colombia. The funds will be used to support a comprehensive program to investigate and prosecute narcotics-related financial crimes, including the so-called Black Market Peso Exchange (BMPE), whereby narcotics traffickers launder drug proceeds through the illicit importation of consumer goods to Colombia. The program will also entail measures directed against tax evasion, money laundering, and financial institution fraud. A portion of the funds will be devoted to combating the counterfeiting of U.S. currency, as Colombia has the highest rate of counterfeiting of U.S. currency in South America. Other measures will focus on regulation and investigation of remitters/currency exchange houses that form part of the BMPE, and other money laundering rings. The program will include training of both Colombian law enforcement officials and financial regulators. Components of the programs include: (1) support for the recently developed Colombian Financial Intelligence Unit, which has been modeled after its U.S. counterpart, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; (2) support for specialized training for Colombian prosecutors and investigators to enable them to effectively use financial intelligence and information in complex investigations and prosecutions; (3) support for specialized training, hardware, and software to Colombian financial sector regulators and institutions; (4) establishment of effective financial information exchange mechanisms between financial investigative entities in Colombia and their counterparts in the U.S. and elsewhere; and (5) provision of training, equipment, and necessary operational support and resources.

The Department plans to use a portion of these funds to implement a new passport system that will give Colombian authorities valuable new law enforcement and security capabilities. An updated computerized system will improve the integrity of the Colombian passport, deter the use of false and altered documents by money launderers and drug smugglers, and give officials responsible for counternarcotics and anti- corruption enforcement a new tool to investigate the activities of suspected criminals.

Anti-Kidnapping Strategy

The Department plans to use $1 million to assist the Government of Colombia to develop and implement a comprehensive program to investigate and prosecute kidnapping and extortion. This multi-faceted program will include the establishment of an operations center to coordinate intelligence and information sharing related to kidnapping and extortion and a "vetted" Colombian law enforcement task force consisting of specially trained investigators and prosecutors to investigate and prosecute these crimes. Where appropriate, the task force will work closely with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, particularly in cases involving U.S. nationals.

Judicial Police Training Program

The Department plans to use $3 million to expand and support the recently established unified law enforcement training academy in Colombia. The academy will provide training to all Colombian police agencies in order to implement a standard curriculum developed with U.S. assistance. The technical police curriculum will be enhanced though the participation of judges, prosecutors, and academics, to ensure that graduates are informed of human rights law, oral court procedures, and other reforms that are coming into place in Colombia. The integrated approach to reform of administration of justice in Colombia includes the professionalization of police investigators, particularly those of the Technical Investigation Corps, also called the judicial police. Protection of crime scenes, conservation of evidence, and appropriate treatment of suspects and victims fall to police officers in their support to investigating prosecutors, and can turn a case when it is presented to the court. Support will include facility design assistance, curriculum and program design and development, training, and equipment.

Witness and Judicial Security and Witness/Judicial Security Human Rights Cases

The Department plans to use $15 million for the following programs.

Operational Expenses and Human Rights Cases

The primary focus of the witness and judicial security programs will be direct operational support to witness and judicial official security and protection activities, especially those related to human rights cases in Colombia. Assistance may include support for a full gamut of operational resource requirements, including direct financial support to protection and security operations in Colombia and elsewhere and the provision of operational services and specialized equipment.

Program Enhancements

The Department plans to use these funds to assess the urgent general requirements in Colombia for effective protection of witnesses and judicial officials now at risk. The U.S. Marshals Service and other appropriate U.S. agencies will assist the Colombian authorities in conducting threat assessments, evaluating existing programs, and developing and implementing a comprehensive program for the protection of witnesses and judicial personnel. Support provided will include sharing of substantive expertise, protection program design and development, and the provision of equipment and training.

Armed Forces Human Rights and Legal Reform

The Department plans to use $1.5 million to train and support the activities of a dedicated cadre of Colombian military human rights/law of war trainers that will travel to all Colombian military units to implement a standard training program on human rights and law of war. Training will be conducted at the Judge Advocate General's School and in Colombia.

Army JAG School

The Department plans to use $1 million to support the establishment of a separate Judge Advocate branch in the Colombian military and a separate Judge Advocate General's School in Colombia. Funding will support the creation of a separate officer branch for Judge Advocates with a specified manpower plan. It will also establish a professional training school in Colombia to train the new judge advocate corps in operational law and other associated legal disciplines.

Training for Customs Police

This includes $1 million for "Customs Training Assistance".

The Department plans to use $3 million to assess the resource and training requirements for the Customs Police affiliated with the Colombian Customs Service (DIAN) . The scope of the assessment will include investigative, border inspection, and border control functions of the Customs Police. Follow-on support will include training curricula development and the provision of appropriate specialized training and equipment.

Maritime Enforcement & Port Security

The Department plans to use $2.5 million to provide support and training for a comprehensive maritime enforcement and port security program in Colombia, including coordination of maritime and port security authorities with the Colombian Anti-Narcotics police, the Navy and Coast Guard, the Counternarcotics Task Forces, the Customs Police, the Financial Intelligence Unit, and the Prosecutor General's Office. The maritime enforcement and port security program will monitor and adjust as appropriate the relationships and division of responsibilities between the Colombian Prosecutor General's Office and the Colombian Navy with respect to the collection, transfer and preservation of evidence. Investigations developed in connection with the maritime enforcement and port security program will be used to support the Bilateral and Multilateral Case Initiatives. Support will include the provision of training, equipment, and necessary operational resources.

Multilateral Case Initiative

The Department plans to use $3 million to support and expand the U.S./Colombia cooperative initiative to investigate, prosecute and arrest transnational narcotics traffickers and money launderers and to collaborate with other nations in the Caribbean and Latin America in a multilateral and mutually supportive approach to the investigation, prosecution, and disposition of these cases. The initiative envisions joint targeting and investigative planning among participating national authorities to ensure optimal use of extradition in order to deny havens to the traffickers and to ensure that these transnational criminals face justice in the most appropriate jurisdictions. Support provided will include investigative planning and appropriate operational resources. Support provided to the Multilateral Case Initiative will substantially complement and reinforce, but will not duplicate support provided to the Asset Forfeiture, Money Laundering, and Financial Crimes Programs.

Prison Security Program

The Department plans to use $4.5 million to enhance the training of Colombian correctional personnel and implement the U.S. Bureau of Prisons advice and recommendations to the Government of Colombia related to prison security contained in survey reports prepared in 1995 and 1997. The Colombian prison security program will require extensive follow-up missions by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons. The program will include evaluations and enhancements to medium and maximum prison facilities located throughout Colombia, with special emphasis on the maximum-security facilities used to house notorious narcotics traffickers being sought for extradition to the U.S., violent criminals, terrorists, guerrillas, paramilitaries, and others convicted of serious human rights abuses. Support will include the provision of subject matter expertise and assistance, training, equipment, and necessary operational support. This funding continues projects begun with funding from the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999.

Banking Supervision Assistance and Revenue Enhancement Assistance

The Department plans to use $1.5 million to provide technical assistance and training by the U.S. Treasury to the GOC's Bank Superintendent for improved supervision of the financial sector, as well as training and support for Colombian Customs officers for border security, control of contraband importation, and increased revenue collection.

Customs Training Assistance

Included in "Training for Customs Police"

Conflict Management and Peace Process

The Department plans to use $3 million to assist the Government of Colombia to evaluate its negotiation strategies and to refine approaches to social and economic issues that surround the negotiations with the FARC and the ELN. Assistance will be provided to NGOs, universities and other civil society groups to gather data to inform the discussion of issues, conduct studies, and facilitate forums for dialogue.

U.N. Office of Human Rights

The Department plans to use $1 million to support the Bogota Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. The funds will be used to monitor and elevate awareness of the human rights situation, strengthen the performance and abilities of UNCHR, and enhance its contributions to promoting the protection of human rights and the rule of law.

U.S. Government Monitoring

The Department plans to use $1.5 million to increase Embassy Bogota and Department staffing in order to enhance monitoring and reporting capabilities as well as to meet new requirements. Funds will also be used to enhance the capabilities of the U.S. Embassy in Bogota to monitor the information necessary for its increased reporting responsibilities, contributing to promoting the protection of human rights.

Organized Financial Crime

Included in "Asset Forfeiture-Money laundering Task Force"

Rehabilitation of Child Soldiers

The Department plans to use $2.5 million for administration and implementation of demobilization and rehabilitation activities for child soldiers in Colombia.

Witness/Judicial Security Human Rights Cases

Included in "Witnesses and Judicial Security Programs"

REGIONAL

Peru

The Department plans to use $32 million to procure and provide up to five KMAX helicopters to the Peruvian National Police (PNP) . Included in this package is initial training for pilots and mechanics, logistical (including spare parts) and technical support for four years. The PNP will use these helicopters to provide extended logistical support for the PNP narcotics police mobile basing plan for drug interdiction. These helicopters will replace the operationally expensive and unreliable Russian MI-17 helicopters.

Bolivia

Interdiction: The Department plans to use $25 million to support interdiction and eradication efforts in the Chapare and Yungas coca growing regions. Funding will also support border control and inspection facilities on the Paraguayan/Argentinean/Brazilian borders; improved checkpoints in the Chapare; intelligence collection; training for helicopter pilots and C-130 pilots and mechanics; spare parts for C-130 aircraft, helicopters and riverine boats; vehicles; training for police and controlled substance prosecutors; and justice sector reforms.

Alternative Development: The Department plans to use $85 million to initiate alternative development in the Yungas region and to further strengthen the sustainability of alternative development in the Chapare. In the Yungas, USAID plans to launch a quick-start high-impact development program that will help the Government of Bolivia (GOB) to achieve its goal of eradicating surplus coca from the region and prevent its resurgence. Program components include a community development fund that consists of road maintenance and improvements; income enhancing activities; strengthening municipal development; improved health services; and public awareness campaigns. In the Chapare, alternative development assistance will be broadened and deepened for former coca growers whose coca has been eradicated but who have not yet received assistance. Assistance will strengthen the self-sustaining process of alternative development by enhancing high-value crop and livestock production, food security, road improvements, access to electricity, agro-processing centers, agro-forestry and tourism promotion. Assistance may be provided through international organizations to support infrastructure improvements in the Yungas, improve crop disease research facilities, and support agricultural rehabilitation of legitimate crops in the Yungas and the Chapare through farmer capacitation and training.

Ecuador

Interdiction: The Department plans to use $12 million to create and improve border checkpoints along the Colombian border, and to improve communications, mobility, interoperability and intelligence collection and information sharing among the police and military units in the northern border regions. Additionally, funding will improve port security and inspection facilities along the coast.

Alternative Development: The Department plans to use $8 million for alternative development and other economic activities to consolidate legitimate government presence in three northern Ecuador provinces. USAID efforts to strengthen municipal governments and local organizations and provide reliable public services will promote a more stable society and reduce Ecuador's vulnerability to the potential impact of Plan Colombia.

Other Countries (Brazil, Venezuela, Panama, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Trinidad & Tobago)

Brazil

The Department plans to use $3.5 million to upgrade the intelligence collection systems in the Amazon Basin regions of Brazil to further enhance the Brazilian SIVAM radar network being installed. Funding will also procure small boats for the Amazon River interdiction efforts.

Venezuela

The Department plans to use $3.5 million to provide interdiction support for the counternarcotics law enforcement units of the Technical Judicial Police (PTJ) and the National Guard for ground and port interdiction. Additionally, funding will support judicial reform and drug policy coordination and demand reduction.

Panama

The Department plans to use $4 million to establish a "vetted" unit task force to be established by DEA and the Technical Judicial Police (PTJ) . This task force will increase cooperation and teamwork in counterdrug law enforcement. This funding will establish, train, and equip the 25-member unit and fund it for four years. Funds will also provide support for the National Maritime Service for the 82' Coastal Patrol boats, border control programs and a stolen vehicle fraud training program.

Costa Rica

The Department plans to use $1.9 million to procure 24' rigid hull inflatable boats, support for 82' coastal patrol boats (e.g., spare parts, maintenance), and training for Costa Rican Coast Guard mechanics and boat operators.

El Salvador

The Department plans to use $3 million to support a new anti-narcotics police headquarters, the establishment of an interagency narcotics operations center, search/detection/interdiction equipment, maritime interdiction equipment, and training for judges, police and prosecutors.

Trinidad and Tobago

The Department plans to use $2.1 million to assist the Government of Trinidad and Tobago in procuring maritime sensor systems for its two C-26 aircraft. This funding will link like maritime counternarcotics surveillance systems in the eastern Caribbean between the Regional Security System (RSS) and Trinidad and Tobago. Additional funds will provide some spare parts for the C-26 aircraft.

All programs included in the emergency assistance to Colombia and the region will require direct involvement of U.S. Government staff and significant management and administrative resources. Therefore, a small amount of the Plan Colombia Supplemental funding will be used to perform critical core administrative functions that directly support these programs.


ASSISTANCE FOR COUNTERNARCOTICS ACTIVITIES

SUPPORT FOR THE PUSH INTO SOUTHERN COLOMBIA 390,500,000
SUPPORT FOR INTERDICTION EFFORTS 129,400,000
SUPPORT FOR THE COLOMBIAN NATIONAL POLICE 115,600,000
SUPPORT FOR ALTERNATIVE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN COLOMBIA 81,000,000
SUPPORT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND JUDICIAL REFORM IN COLOMBIA 122,000,000
REGIONAL 180,000,000
$1,018,500,000

SUPPORT FOR THE PUSH INTO SOUTHERN COLOMBIA

Train and Equip CNBNs 7,000,000
Army Counternarcotics Battalion UH1N Program 60,000,000
Army Counternarcotics Battalion UH-60 Black Hawk Program 208, 000,000
Army Counternarcotics Battalion UH-1H Huey II Program 60,000,000
Sustain Army Counternarcotics Battalions 6,000,000
Forward Infrastructure Development 3,000,000
Force Protection Enhancements 4,000,000
Logistical Support 4,400,000
Army Counternarcotics Battalion Organic Intelligence 9,000,000
Training for Senior Commanders 1,100,000
Army Counternarcotics Battalion Communications 3,000,000
Provide Alternative Development in Southern Colombia 10,000,000
Temporary Emergency Resettlement and Employment 15,000,000
$390,500,000

SUPPORT FOR INTERDICTION EFFORTS

Upgrade Colombian Air Force OV-l0 Aircraft 15,000,000
Upgrade Aircraft for Night Operations 1,900,000
Airfield Upgrades 8,000,000
Upgrade U.S. Customs Service P-3 Aircraft Radar Programs 68,000,000
Support for Colombian Air Interdiction Program 19,500,000
Support for Colombian Riverine Interdiction Program 12,000,000
Ammunition for Colombian Riverine Interdiction Support 2,000,000
Colombian Navy Operations Infrastructure Support 1,000,000
OFAC Entitlements 2,000,000
$129,400,000

SUPPORT FOR THE COLOMBIAN NATIONAL POLICE

Secure Communications 3,000,000
Weapons and Ammunition 3,000,000
UH-60 Black Hawk Procurement and Support 26,000,000
Enhance Logistical Support 2,000,000
CNP Forward Operating Capability and Force Protection 5,000,000
CNP Border Bases Construction 5,000,000
Additional CNP Airmobile Unit 2,000,000
Upgrade CNP Aviation Facilities 8,000,000
Additional Spray Aircraft 20,000,000
Upgrade Existing CNP Airplanes (including FLIR) 5,000,000
Upgrade (12) UH-1H Helicopters to Huey II Configuration 20,600,000
Sustainment and Operations 5,000,000
Training for Pilots and Mechanics 2,000,000
Airfield Security 2,000,000
Enhanced Eradication 4,000,000
Spare Parts 3,000,000
$115,600,000

SUPPORT FOR ALTERNATIVE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN COLOMBIA

Environmental Programs 2,500,000
Voluntary Eradication Programs 30,000,000
Assistance to Local Governments 1 12,000,000
Assistance for Internally Displaced Persons 22,500,000
AID Operating Expenses in Colombia 4,000,000
Community-Level Alternative Development 1 10,000,000
$81,000,000

1 Narratives for Community-Level Alternative Development and Assistance to Local Governments are combined.

SUPPORT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND JUDICIAL REFORM IN COLOMBIA

Protection of Human Rights Workers 4,000,000
Strengthen Human Rights Institutions 7,000,000
Establish CNP/Fiscalia Human Rights Units 25,000,000
Judicial System Policy Reform 1,000,000
Criminal Code Reform 1,500,000
Prosecutor Training 4,000,000
Judges Training 3,500,000
Casa de Justicia Judicial Training 1,000,000
Public Defender Program 2,000,000
Asset Forfeiture-Money-Laundering Task Force 2 15,000,000
Anti-Kidnapping Strategy 1,000,000
Judicial Police Training Program 3,000,000
Witness and Judicial Security 3 5,000,000
Armed Forces Human Rights and Legal Reform 1,500,000
Army JAG School 1,000,000
Training for Customs Police 2,000,000
Maritime Enforcement & Port Security 2,500,000
Multilateral Case Initiative 3,000,000
Prison Security Program 4,500,000
Banking Supervision Assistance 1,000,000
Revenue Enhancement Assistance 500,000
Customs Training Assistance 4 1,000,000
Conflict Management and Peace Process 3,000,000
U.N. Office of Human Rights 1,000,000
U.S. Government Monitoring 1,500,000
Organized Financial Crime 2 14,000,000
Rehabilitation of Child Soldiers 2,500,000
Witness/Judicial Security Human Rights Cases 3 10,000,000
$122,000,000

2 Narratives for Asset Forfeiture-Money Laundering Task Force and Organized Financial Crime are combined.

3 Narrative for Witness and Judicial Security and Witness/Judicial Security Human Rights Cases are combined.

4 Narrative for Training for Customs Police and Customs Training Assistance are combined.

REGIONAL

Development
Interdiction
Total
KMAX Helicopters
32,000,000
Bolivia
85,000,000
25,000,000
110,000,000
Ecuador
8,000,000
12,000,000
20,000,000
Venezuela
3,500,000
3,500,000
Brazil
3,500,000
3,500,000
Panama
4,000,000
4,000,000
Costa Rica
1,900,000
1,900,000
El Salvador
3,000,000
3,000,000
Trinidad and Tobago
2,100,000
2,100,000

$180,000,000

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